Philippine Group: Changing Urban Landscape: A Public Urban Space and Governance in Three Philippine Cities

"...the effectiveness of a city plan does not entirely depend on the technical ability of those who prepared that plan.... The city plan depends a great deal on its popular acceptance and support." - A. C. Kayanan, A.L.A., Manila city planner & engineer 1947.
Cagayan de Oro and Cebu developed from pre?colonial barangay to colonial "Pueblo" or town. The pueblo layout presents the church and the colonial administrative buildings surrounding the open public space called the town plaza. Beyond these are the public market and gradations of residences. From the old "pueblo" layout of Cagayan de Oro, Cebu and Lapu?lapu cities expanded into a medium sized and mega cities. By design, the pueblos were not prepared for the present mode of transportation and other amenities of modern lifestyle. Thus, managing old cities to fit to the present socioeconomic demands means a lot of re?adjustments. This put pressure on whatever is left of the surviving public spaces in these cities. In her report, Lorna Manila presents Cebu and Lapu?lapu cities in the island of Cebu in central Philippines as major urban centers and metropolitan areas where commercial, industrial, institutional, and recreational hubs are situated. The changes in their land uses, through massive land developments which were made only to cater to the requirements of the growth objectives of the local and national governments, have affected their urban environment and landscapes.
In her report, Lorna Manila presents Cebu and Lapu?lapu cities in the island of Cebu in central Philippines as major urban centers and metropolitan areas where commercial, industrial, institutional, and recreational hubs are situated. The changes in their land uses, through massive land developments which were made only to cater to the requirements of the growth objectives of the local and national governments, have affected their urban environment and landscapes.
In a micro scale, Dexter Lo reports on how Cagayan de Oro's "Divisoria", which is a public space consisting of five plazas (blocks) in between R. N. Abejuela and T. Neri streets, have been transformed from a fire break to shrines of local heroes and currently as tourism destination called "Nite Café". The current use of this historical public space persistently raised both positive and negative issues focused on alcoholism, influx of foreign arts and goods as an attack to local cultural preservation and promotion, issue on safety to tourists and the surrounding built infrastructures, proper sanitation, waste generation and management, health risk, and traffic congestions have been unsettled debates between local stakeholders and policy makers.
Finally, the tales of these three cities, Cagayan de Oro, Cebu and Lapu?lapu, present a discourse on the use of public space and its management.
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Manila_Urban Development in the Philippines.pdf8.74 MB